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2013 Edition Of Jumpstarting The Transit Space Race Interactive Map Released

"The total required to build just those 497 projects would be $250 billion. At the current rate of federal transit investment, it would require more than 78 years to construct those projects."

Reconnecting America today released an updated version of its Jumpstarting the Transit Space Race interactive map, which documents the national interest in fixed-guideway transit. The fresh data show demand for transit development is even greater than when the first Space Race report was released in October 2008.

The 2013 edition of the map identifies 721 projects in 109 regions, up from 643 projects found in 109 regions in 2011. Of the current projects, 497 have a cost estimate. The total required to build just those 497 projects would be $250 billion.  At the current rate of federal transit investment, it would require more than 78 years to construct those projects.

“This interest in transit opens a window of opportunity to make a federal investment that would create jobs, reduce America’s dependence on foreign oil, and enhance national and economic security,” said Reconnecting America President and CEO John Robert Smith.

The 2013 edition of the Space Race map includes all of the fixed-guideway transit projects currently under construction and planned in the United States.  This list was gathered in 2012 from local sources including -- but not limited to -- long range plans, discussions with local officials, and newspaper coverage.

"We understand that these projects are fluid and the estimates of cost as well as the projects themselves are subject to change frequently," said Jeff Wood, Reconnecting America's chief cartographer and lead author of the Space Race reports. "This list should be seen as a snapshot in time, which gives us a window into the magnitude of the need for greater funding and cooperation locally, regionally, and at the federal level." 

Fixed-guideway projects on the map include heavy rail, commuter rail, light rail, streetcars, various technologies such as cog railways, and those bus rapid transit lines that have more than 50 percent of their right-of-way dedicated to bus-only lanes. The map does not include statewide projects such as the California high-speed rail effort.

View the map and explore the data